Real-World Datasets

Grappling with real-world data can make complex issues issues, like sea level rise, more tangible and meaningful to students. The real-world datasets below are collected from buoys, satellites, and observation networks around the world. This data can be used as a springboard for classroom conversations about ocean science, analyzing climate change models, and conducting citizen science. To learn more about these and other datasets, contact our education and outreach team.

Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System (CeNCOOS)

CCeNCOOS provides real-time and historical maps about 30 different water conditions in Humboldt, Sonoma, San Francisco Bay, Monterey Bay, and San Luis Bay.

Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)

CO-OPS provides tide and current maps; historical and projected sea levels; and forecast modeling systems.

Data in the Classroom

Data in the Classroom provides datasets and background information about El Niño, sea level, water quality, ocean acidification, and coral bleaching. Data is searchable by topic, date, and geographic location. The corresponding background information contains questions to check students’ understanding.

Digital Elevation Model (DEM)

DEM provides layers of coastal relief, global relief, Great Lakes relief, and tsunami inundation data.

NOAA Ocean Data Education (NODE) Project

NODE develops curriculum for grades 6-8 designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale.

Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS)

NANOOS provides more than 30 types of datasets about air temperature, water temperature, winds, waves, tides, currents, salinity, pH, and chlorophyll in California, Oregon, and Washington.

National Data Buoy Center

National Data Buoy Center provides datasets about hurricanes, tropical storms, tropical depressions, and tsunamis. Data is reported from 1,334 stations around the world.

National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC)

National Data Buoy Center provides datasets about hurricanes, tropical storms, tropical depressions, and tsunamis. Data is reported from 1,334 stations around the world.

Science on a Sphere Explorer (SOSx)

SOSx takes Science on a Sphere datasets, usually only seen on a 6-foot sphere in large museum spaces, and makes them publically accessible. The visualizations show information provided by satellites, ground observations, and computer models.

Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS)

SCCOOS provides dataset about algae, currents, El Niño, flooding, ocean acidification, ride tides, seabirds, storms, and waves in Southern California.