Coastal Bay & Tributary Fisheries

Fisheries in coastal bays and tributaries in Washington and Oregon are managed by the states and tribes. In Washington, the fisheries are co-managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and four coastal tribes including the Hoh, Makah, Quileute Tribes and Quinault Nation. Each of the tribes works with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to manage the fisheries in their home waters. The pre-season planning for these fisheries for Chinook and coho salmon occurs in the spring, in conjunction with the Pacific Fishery Management Council and North of Falcon processes. This close coordination allows for the consideration of catches that will occur in ocean and in-river fisheries. This is necessary to meet conservation objectives and ensures that allocation objectives for the state and tribal fisheries are met.

In Oregon, the fisheries are managed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife works through the Pacific Fishery Management Council to plan ocean fisheries that affect Chinook and coho salmon returning to the Oregon coast. At the same time, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife seeks to provide opportunity for recreational fisheries that occur in coastal bays and tributaries. Oregon coast coho are listed under the Endangered Species Act. The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Fishery Management Plan provides a harvest management matrix that defines the allowable exploitation rate for wild Oregon coast coho estimates of escapement and marine survival. The allowable harvest varies from year-to-year depending on estimates of escapement and marine survival. The matrix defines a total exploitation rate for each of the Oregon coastal populations and all ocean and in-river fisheries. Once the ocean fisheries are set, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife can manage the tributary fisheries to provide for recreational fisheries that may occur within the overall ESA-related limit.